Friendship-Rodriguez

I’ll always be beside you

Until the very end, wiping all your tears away’

Being your best friend. I’ll smile when you smile and

Feel all the pain you do, and if you cry a single tear,

I promise I’ll cry too

You are my best friend

You were from the start

Together we stand strong and we shall never part.

We found a friendship so powerful and true

That I know it’ll last forever

The days were so crazy…

That people thought we were high…

And days we were so bored…

We laughed so hard we cried!

All the inside jokes..

And saying “Remember when.”

Just some of the reasons we’ll always be best friends.

By:Lizeth Rodriguez

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“We Wear the Mask” by Paul Laurence Dunbar – Rodriguez

Lizeth Rodriguez

Ms. Nelson

English 3 Period

February 13,2012

In the poem “We Wear the Mask” by Paul Laurence Dunbar, Paul uses metaphors and personification to create the theme that we smile when we are actually sad to show no one what we feel.
Paul wrote the poem ” We Wear the Mask.  ” “We wear the mask that grins and lies, it hides our cheeks and shades our eyes” Paul wrote this in his poem.  Paul is saying that we fake smiles that won’t show what we are really feeling. We hide our real feelings with a mask of happiness. We just hide from our true feelings.
In Paul’s poem “We Wear the Mask,” he uses very good words to describe us.  “With torn and bleeding hearts we smile” is one of the sentences from his poem.  What Paul is trying to say is even though we are sad we just fake a smile so no one knows what we really feel. We just smile even though we are actually sad.
Paul, throughout the poem, is saying that we hide our feelings with a smile. “Why should the world be overwise,  in counting all our tears and sighs?” Paul says in his poem. Paul is saying that why should everyone see us cry and be sad. We should at times be sad but also happy.
We should just not hide with a smile. Like Paul says in his poem ” Beneath our feet, and long the mile; But let the world dream otherwise, we wear the mask!” In other words let the people just see us cry as we wear our smile. We should just show what we are really feeling not just fake what we really want to feel. We should just be happy when we want to and also be sad whenever we want.

Paul Laurence Dunbar-Rodriguez

Paul Laurence Dunbar

Born:June 27, 187

Died: February 9, 1906

Paul Laurence Dunbar was the first African-American poet to garner national critical acclaim.  Born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1872.  He wrote a lot of dialect poems, standard English poems, essays, novels and short stories before he died at the age of 33.  His work was often about the difficulties encountered by members of his race and the efforts of African-Americans to achieve equality in America.

He was praised both by the prominent literary critics of his time and his literary contemporaries.  Paul was born on June 27, 1872, to Matilda and Joshua Dunbar, both Kentucky natives.  His mother was a former slave and his father escaped from slavery and served in the 55th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment.

Matilda and Joshua had two other children before separating in 1874.  His mother also had two children from a previous marriage.  The family was poor, and after his father left, his mother supported her children by working in Dayton as a washerwoman.  One of the families she worked for was the  family of Orville and Wilbur Wright, with whom her son attended Dayton’s Central High School.

Paul’s mother inspired him to write poetry and he started at the earliest age of 6.  He was the only African-American in his class at school and while he had a difficult time finding a job because of his race he rose to great heights at school.  He also wrote for community newspapers.  He worked as an elevator operator until h established himself locally and nationally as a writer.  His first public reading was on his birthday in 1892.

After returning from England, Dunbar married Alice Ruth Moore, a young writer, teacher and proponent of racial and gender equality who had a master’s degree from Cornell University.  Dunbar took a job at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. He found the work tiresome, however, and it is believed the library’s dust contributed to his worsening case of tuberculosis.  He worked there for only a year before quitting to write and recite full time.

In 1902, Dunbar and his wife separated. Depression stemming from the end of his marriage and declining health drove him to a dependence on alcohol, which further damaged his health.  He continued to write, however.  He ultimately produced 12 books of poetry, four books of short stories, a play and five novels.  His work appeared in Harper’s Weekly, the Sunday Evening Post, the Denver Post, Current Literature and a number of other magazines and journals.  He traveled to Colorado and visited his half-brother in Chicago before returning to his mother in Dayton in 1904.  He died there on Feb. 9, 1906.

www.dunbarsite.org

www.dunbarsite.org/biopld.asp

 


Paul Laurence Dunbar- Luis Rodriguez

Paul Laurence Dunbar was the first African-American poet to garner national acclaim. Born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1872, he wrote a large body of dialect poems, standard English poems, essays, novels and short stories before he died at the age of 33.

 His work often addressed the difficulties encountered by members of his race and the efforts of African-Americans to achieve equality in America. He was praised both by the prominent literary critics of his time and his literary contemporaries.

Paul was born on June 27, 1872, to Matilda and Joshua Dunbar, both Kentucky natives. His mother was a former slave and his father had escaped from slavery. His father served in the 55th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment and the 5th Massachusetts Colored Cavalry Regiment during the Civil War.

Matilda and Joshua had two children before separating in 1874. Matilda also had two children from a previous marriage. His family was poor, and after his father left, his mother supported her children by working in Dayton as a washerwoman.

Paul’s family had little wealth, Matilda, always a great support to Paul as a literary stature grew. He heard poems read by the family

Having heard poems read by the family she worked for when she was a slave, Matilda loved poetry and encouraged her children to read. Dunbar was inspired by his mother, and he began reciting and writing poetry as early as age 6.